The CBS show Pink Collar Crimes has sensationalized a niche area of criminal law that some may find interesting. While the media likes to bring attention to a subject by giving it an unusual name, you and other Virginia residents should understand that “pink collar crime” is an unofficial term for crimes committed by women. In fact, take gender out of it and pink collar crime is a trendy term for white collar criminal activities.

Forbes explains that since 1970, the number of women in U.S. jails has increased by 14 times. Many women in prison have been convicted of white collar crimes, such as embezzlement, money laundering and fraud. Typically, as you may know, people who are accused of a white collar crime were placed in positions of trust financially. They may be bookkeepers, accountants or – especially pertaining to pink collar crimes – PTA representatives and volunteers for school and extracurricular functions.

Aside from gender, what sets pink collar crimes apart from white collar crimes, you may wonder? Women usually participate for financial stability and security, aiming to help their families. Often, they intended to do it once or twice and didn’t mean to hurt someone else or to get caught up in a cycle of repeated crime. Many women, after serving their time, feel remorse and hope to educate others to discourage them from making the mistakes they did.

You are entitled to a competent defense regardless of intent or circumstances regarding the crime that you are accused of. Therefore, this information should not serve as legal advice.